Sunday, June 7, 2009

Babies for Beans

















I haven't written or posted anything for my blog for quite awhile now, and the truth be known I needed to take a bit of a break from the sometimes all consuming thoughts, emotions and feelings about adoption loss and adoption reunion.

None the less, I have not stopped thinking about it all together. No, those thoughts are deeply embedded in my brain and my Psyche. Scarred for life you might say by the affects of adoption on my life and the need to talk about it openly and honestly to those that most need to hear the truth.

However it seems that those that could benefit from it the most don't want to hear the truth and those that fuel the adoption industry relish in the fact that the majority of the population have bought in to the fairy tale about adoption and the forever family. Most refuse to even listen to the adoptees themselves as they cry out for justice and their rights to their heritage.

I am beginning to believe that mankind has finally sunk lower than a snakes belly and that's about as low as one can get. I kid you not, I took a double take when I saw this little tidbit.

Check it out: Fair Trade Coffees Helping Orphans & Their Forever Families


SMAAC ~ The truth will set you free.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks like Rob's helping himself! I bet he pays his workers (the women in the photo sorting beans) enough to keep their babies. After all, they're probably one of his best networking resources for finding organically birthed "orphans".

Amazing how people profit off of others and then turn it into the typical "savior saving babies" story. Rob - there is something in the name, no?

~C

barry said...

i'm still not sure how i happened on your blog but i had to contact you evven before i've really digested it. i'm a male lawyer who has used the indian child welfare act to attempt to correct the evil done against indian mothers, families and children in the name of the 'best interest'. i won't go into the full range of my feelings but i assure you i'm immediately completely sympathetic to what you write. i can be contacted at bwbenefield@yahoo.com. i notice my occasional blog hasnt yet dealt with these issues but maybe its time: http://littlebluenews.blogspot.com/

barry said...

guess i should leave a real comment also. the indian experience, which is being replicated elsewhere, is to offer cute young children to willing and needy adoptive parents who are utterlyunconnected to the children's culture. the culture itself is denigrated by presumptions against the natural parents. then when the child and the world around her or him gets more real, eg, the teenage years the adoptive parents are u tterly unprepared to deal with the realities the child faces, particularly where they are surrounded by others not of their color or culture. just as importantly the child's ongoing real need to connect to their real family and culture are simply ignored. when the children get old enough to try to play this need out by themselves great damage has been done to their ability to do so.
and dont get me started about how the child's real 'best interest' is ignored in furtherance of the adoptive parents' desire for children and the court and welfare systems' need to process children on down the line so their situation will no longer be a visible problem.

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Sandy Young said...

It never ceases to amaze me the way something that would otherwise be a criminal act suddenly becomes a saintly endeavor when the word "ADOPTION" is added. Even to the point of surrogacy and having babies for wealthy americans is seen as a cottage industry for poor women in India. It is disgusting.

Leslielzxr said...


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